A drowsy driver in Shreveport recently drove himself right into Cross Lake.  Luckily, there were no injuries, but had he been driving on Bert Kouns Industrial Loop, the driver could have totaled more than just his pickup truck. 

The driver pleaded exhaustion; there are many reasons that a person may drive while drowsy – but other than a previously unknown medical condition, none are legitimate.

Drivers who operate motor vehicles while excessively sleepy are just as dangerous as drivers who drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol – so says the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The most recent data from the NHTSA includes a report that studied crashes as a result of drowsy driving or fatigued driving.

While some studies claim that around 2% of crashes can be attributed to fatigue, other reputable sources, like the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, believe the number to be far higher.

AAA studied data from NHTSA and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  They concluded that 16.5% of all fatal crashes were the result of drowsy driving, and researchers say that the numbers are rising.

Drowsy driving causes 16.5%, or 5000+ crash deaths annually

It may seem like a new phenomenon, but it’s not.  Nearly 10 years ago the state of Massachusetts formed a special commissioned to study the subject.  They concluded that it’s possible that 1.2 million crashes – more than 8000 people per year – lose their lives to drowsy drivers.

While the exact number of crash fatalities cannot be known, the police are trained to look for signs of driver error that point to fatigue and statistical methodologies that indicate drowsiness was a factor.

Fatigue crashes most likely:

  • Occur between 1am to 6am or in the late afternoon
  • Feature a single driver with no passengers going off-road
  • Include high rates of speed with no evidence of braking at the scene of the accident
  • Involve rear-end and head-on crashes

Next Steps

The only way that drivers can avoid driver fatigue is to get more sleep – but many people think that short term measures like drinking strong coffee or energy drinks will help.  Drivers might temporarily feel more alert, but the effects wear off quickly.

If you or a loved one has been involved in an accident or car crash, please call Ross Downs immediately. Call 888-771-9800 to schedule a free consultation.

Be vigilant, watch for signs of fatigue

It is reasonable to assume that at some point you will engage with a sleep-deprived driver – but you can mitigate the damage that your family may suffer if you practice these defensive driving measures:

  • Be aware of your surroundings
  • Have an escape route
  • Be vigilant during peak drowsy driving times
  • Watch for drivers who engage with rumble strips or cross road lines

If someone crashes in to your vehicle and you believe that the driver may be sleep-deprived or fatigued, please call the Downs Law Firm immediately.  The Ross Downs Law Firm is more than a simple resource for accident and injury law – our mission is to champion the rights of victims who have been wronged.

Ross Downs is dedicated to getting justice for you – he is on your side.  Call the Ross Downs Law Firm to schedule a free case evaluation.

The Ross Downs Law Firm

517 North Washington Street

Bastrop, LA 71220

1-888-771-9800